James H. North: Leopold Stokowski and "His Symphony Orchestra"

 


 


 


 

Leopold Stokowski and "His Symphony Orchestra"

Personnel Rosters for the RCA Victor Recordings as Described by James H. North

 

Stokowski His Symphony Orchestra

 

Stokowski with score

 

Other Articles about Stokowski:
click here read about Stokowki Transcriptions by José Serebrier
click here to read about Leopold Stokowski and British Music by Edward Johnson
click here to read about Stokowski and Vaughan Williams by Edward Johnson
click here to read about Stokowski's Return to Britain by Edward Johnson
click here to read about Letters to Stokowski by Edward Johnson
click here to read about Stokowski and "His Symphony Orchestra" by James H. North
click here to read a biography of Leopold Stokowski
click here to read about great symphony orchestras of the USA
click here to go to the Home Page of stokowski.org

 

Leopold Stokowski and "His Symphony Orchestra" by James H. North

 

From 1947 to 1953, "Leopold Stokowski and His Symphony Orchestra" made about 100 recordings for RCA Victor. Conventional wisdom has it that this orchestra was a mix of players from the New York Philharmonic, the NBC Symphony, and local freelancers. That turns out to be very misleading. This article identifies the musicians in all but one of the RCA recordings, specifies their professional association at the time, and draws some unexpected conclusions.

 

On 21 April 1945, Leopold Stokowski married debutante Gloria Vanderbilt, often described as the most beautiful girl in the world; he was 58, she 21. In 1947 they moved into one of two magnificent penthouses atop 10 Gracie Square in New York City. Across the way lived a famous, popular conductor with an awkward foreign accent who was known for arranging other people’s music and was looked down upon by musical snobs, one who made many best-selling recordings with "His Orchestra" and lived with his gorgeous, glamorous wife: Andre Kostelanetz and Lily Pons were a mirror image of the Stokowskis.

 

While disentangling himself from the Philadelphia Orchestra in the late 1930s, Stokowski led a peripatetic existence: Hollywood, Garbo, Fantasia. Like Sir Thomas Beecham, he founded and conducted new orchestras at every turn: the All-American Youth Orchestra, the New York City Symphony, the Hollywood Bowl Symphony Orchestra, and eventually the American Symphony Orchestra.

Stokowski Greta Garbo

Stokowski and Greta Garbo featured in a 1938 movie magazine

 

He needed a major orchestra of his own, and he seemed to get it when Toscanini left the NBC Symphony Orchestra in 1941, but the old maestro returned in 1944. Stokowski’s four-year campaign to take over the New York Philharmonic failed, probably because its board of directors felt they would not be able to control him. Victor, America’s only major classical-music recording company, rested on its laurels in the late 1930s, and the young upstart Columbia Records stole many of Victor’s prize orchestras. Columbia signed the Philadelphia Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic, plus the orchestras of Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Minneapolis, and - briefly - Chicago. RCA was left with the Boston Symphony and its own NBC Symphony, but both their superstar conductors were nearing retirement, ageing fast. Thus "Leopold Stokowski and His Symphony Orchestra" was created out of smoke and mirrors. Who were those masked men (and women)? Endless discussions have been waged about members of the Philharmonic, the NBC, and local freelance musicians. It is time to set the record straight.

 

This was not a permanent orchestra, and it did not give regular public concerts (a few special performances using the title were given later in the 1950s). It was contracted for each recording session by Joseph Fabbroni, who also contracted many sessions for the RCA Victor Symphony and similarly named ensembles, as well as assembling the original New York City Opera Orchestra 1. Every musician who played in all but one of these recordings is identified here, and we track their "day job" at the time of each session. At least 22 musicians played in both the NBC Symphony and the New York Philharmonic. One group followed Toscanini from the Philharmonic to NBC in 1937; others started as founding members of the NBC and went over to the Philharmonic in the early 1940s, when Toscanini was in semi-retirement and Artur Rodzinski was rebuilding the Philharmonic. Rodzinski, a Stokowski protege, knew whom to recruit, as he - at Toscanini’s request - had auditioned and hired the initial personnel of the NBC Symphony. Stokowski too knew all the musicians well: He had been the NBC Symphony’s principal conductor during Toscanini’s absence, and he conducted 158 performances with the Philharmonic from 1946 to 1950 (the final one, on 9 April 1950, was Mahler’s Eighth Symphony, which the author was privileged to attend).

M&A CD 1130

Stokowski's 1950 Mahler Symphony no 8 issued on Music & Arts CD1130

 

Among former NBC members who played for the Philharmonic at the time of these sessions were Carl Stern, cello; John Wummer and Benjamin Gaskins, flute; William Polisi, bassoon; and William Bell, tuba. Several freelancers played for Stokowski before joining the Philharmonic (violinists Alfred Breuning and David Nadien, flutist Julius Baker, oboist Robert Lehrfeld, and trumpeter Carmine Fornarotto), others such as Nicolai Berezowsky and Calmen Fleisig after they left the Philharmonic, so they too are counted as freelancers. Special mention must be made of Robert Bloom, who was first oboe for almost every session of Stokowski’s orchestra. Bloom played for Stokowski in the Philadelphia Orchestra from 1930 to 1936; he began as second oboe, but the conductor asked him to switch to English horn, which he did, playing the solo in the 1934 Dvorak "New World" recording. After a year as first oboe in the Rochester Philharmonic under Jose Iturbi, Bloom became founding principal oboe of the NBC Symphony. He retired from all orchestral positions in 1946, a year before these sessions began. Bloom’s soft, warm oboe was the primary reason that Stokowski’s orchestra did not sound like the Philharmonic, which was sparked by Harold Gomberg’s bright, piquant tone.

Most of the data presented here are taken from RCA recording logs, examined at Sony Music Archives. Musicians' names appear there with only first initials, and misspelled names are so rampant as to suggest that they were typed - by a secretary unfamiliar with musicians - from lists scribbled in an abysmal handwriting: Arrowsmith becomes Arrewemit; bassoonist Harold Goltzer appears twice, spelled H. Coltzer the first time and H. Gootzer the second. Payment sheets, available only for the earliest sessions, offer more reliable spelling.

1947 session log

1947 RCA session log with personnel list

 

The primary problem in presenting this information is space: How to list every performer in all 76 sessions without creating a book-length tome? Tables of performers/sessions prove impractical, as most personnel rosters exceed the length of a page. A slightly awkward compromise has been adapted: Recording sessions are listed chronologically, but groups of from two to six consecutive sessions with similar personnel have been combined into one list. Each session is assigned a letter: A, B, C, D, E. When a musician appeared in less than all of those sessions, his name is followed by letters indicting which ones: Marcus Fischer (ABDE) means that the horn player participated in all but the third of the five sessions under consideration; Ross W. Taylor (E) indicates a single appearance, in the fifth session. The first time a player appears, a given name is included; thereafter, only a last name. A first initial is used wherever confusion might result (several families of musicians are represented here). The first-listed violin is concertmaster for that session. On two or three occasions, a first violinist in one session plays second violin in another session on the same list; this distinction is not always made, as the lists are already too complex. Another compression tactic is to list recorded works in a briefest recognizable form; any misunderstandings may be cleared up by reference to one of the many Stokowski discographies. A final space-saver is to use roman characters for Philharmonic members and italics for all others (NBC players are individually cited).

The idea of "Leopold Stokowski and His Symphony Orchestra" originated about 1944. RCA recording sheets use that title for a number of 1944 and 1945 sessions, but the issued records were labeled "New York City Symphony Orchestra". The major works recorded were:

10 December 1944 Strauss: Death and Transfiguration
11 December 1944 Tchaikovsky: Romeo and Juliet (not issued)
20 February 1945 Beethoven: Symphony no 6
28 February 1945 Music from Bizet's Carmen
2 March 1945 Wagner: Tristan und Isolde: Prelude and Liebestod (not issued)

 

A similar situation occurred in California the following summer. Stokowski recorded several works at Republic Studios in Hollywood, with the musicians of the Hollywood Bowl Symphony Orchestra. The issued records identified that ensemble.

25 July 1945 Tchaikovsky: Symphony no 6 "Pathétique"
Tchaikovsky-Stokowski: "Solitude"
1 August 1945 Brahms: Symphony no 1
Tchaikovsky: Marche slave
Dvorak: Humoresque
29 August 1945 Tchaikovsky Sleeping Beauty - excerpts (not issued)
4 September 1945 Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto no 2 - Artur Rubinstein (not issued by Victor)

 

The real "His Symphony Orchestra" began with twelve sessions in 1947. The first three were held in the ballroom of the Lotos Club, at 5 East 66th Street in New York City; they then moved to Manhattan Center, 311 West 34th Street. The orchestra’s final RCA recording, Dances from The Three-Cornered Hat, was made at Webster Hall, 119-125 East 11th Street. Sessions lasted from three to five hours, and were held at all times of day, including after midnight. Richard Gilbert was RCA’s producer in 1947. No recordings were made in 1948, due to a strike by the American Federation of Musicians. In 1949, Richard Mohr took over, producing the remaining sessions.

Recording Sessions

 

The first session supports the common assumption that the ensemble was made up of musicians from the Philharmonic (15), the NBC Symphony (seven: Philip Frank, Herbert Borodkin, Frank Miller, Milton Prinz, Arthur Lora, Harry Moskovitch, and Richard Moore), and freelancers (21). That would soon change.

Victor 49-0296

RCA Victor 45 RPM 49-0296 Tchaikovsky Andante

26 February 1947 "Traditional Russian Christmas Music" (Stokowski transcription from Ippolitov-Ivanov)
Tchaikovsky Symphony no 5: themes from the Andante movement
Violin I: Roman Totenberg, Paul Gershman, Jacques Gasselin, David Rosensweig, Louis Gabowitz, Jeanne Mitchell, George Ockner, Samuel Carmell
Violin II: Imre Pogany, Philip Frank, Jacques Neiblum, David Kulinyi, David Sackson
Viola: William Lincer, Lillian Stein, Herbert Borodkin, Joseph Fick.
Cello: Frank Miller, Milton Prinz, Rudolph Sims, Esther Gruhn
Double Bass: Frederick Zimmerman, Robert Brennand
Flute: Arthur Lora, Harry Moskovitch, Benjamin Gaskins
Oboe: Robert Bloom, Ferdinand Prior
Clarinet: David Oppenheim, Luigi Cancellieri
Bassoon: Sol Schoenbach, James L. Dickie
French Horn: Joseph Singer, John Barrows, Richard Moore, Rodney Brown
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, Nathan Prager, James Smith.
Trombone: W. Jack Satterfield, Alex S. Tarrand, Al Godlis
Tuba: William Bell    Timpani: Alvin Broemel

 

For the next two 1947 sessions, the tally is Philharmonic: 29, NBC: four (Frank, Borodkin, Lora, and Moskovitch), freelance: 26.

Victor LM-2042

RCA Victor LM-2042: Toccata and Fugue BWV 565

A: 22 March 1947 Bach: Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565 - Stokowski transcription
Enesco: Romanian Rhapsody no 1, opus 11
B: 29 March 1947 Beethoven-Stokowski: Moonlight Sonata
Debussy-Stokowski: Claire de lune
Handel: Messiah: Pastoral Symphony (arranged by Stokowski)
Violin I: Michael Rosenker, Paul Gershman, Maximilian Pilzer, Werner Lywen (A), Louis Gabowitz, Jeanne Mitchell, David Rosensweig, Frank Gullino, George Ockner, Nicolai Berezowsky (A)
Violin II: Imre Pogany, Philip Frank, Jacques Neiblum, David Kulinyi, George Rabin, David Sackson
Viola: William Lincer, Lillian Stein, Herbert Borodkin (A), Walter Trampler, Harold Colletta (B)
Cello: Leonard Rose, Carl Stern, Nathan Stutch, Esther Gruhn
Double Bass: Anselm Fortier, Robert Brennand
Flute: Arthur Lora, Harry Moskovitch (A), Frederick Wilkins (A), Benjamin Gaskins (doubling piccolo)
Oboe: Robert Bloom, Ferdinand Prior, Marc Lifschey (B), Bert Gassman - doubling english horn (A)
Clarinet: David Oppenheim, Eric Simon, Leonard Schaller - doubling bass clarinet
Bassoon: William Polisi, James L. Dickie    Contra-bassoon: Roberto Sensale
French Horn: James Chambers, John Barrows, Joseph Singer - also tenor tuba 22 March 1947, William Namen (A), Rodney Brown
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, Nathan Prager, James Smith (A), Arthur C. Statter (A)
Trombone: Gordon Pulis, Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander
Tuba: William Bell    Timpani: Alvin Broemel (A)
Percussion: Carroll Bratman, Walter Rosenberger (A), Saul Goodman (A)
Harp: Theodore Cella, Marjorie Tyre (A)    Celesta: Martin Gabowitz (A)

In November 1947, the sessions moved to Manhattan Center. No NBC member appears on the roster.

Victor WDM-1205

Victor WDM-1205 45 RPM of the Sleeping Beauty

11, 12, 13, 14 November 1947 Tchaikovsky: suite from the Sleeping Beauty
Violin I: John Corigliano, Frank Gullino, Michael Rosenker, David Rosensweig, Michael de Stefano, Louis Gabowitz, Jeanne Mitchell, Maximilian Pilzer
Violin II: Imre Pogany, Arthur Schuller, Armand Neveux, Jacques Neiblum, David Kulinyi, Morris Kreiselman
Viola: William Lincer, Lillian Stein, Joseph Vieland, Harold Colletta
Cello: Carl Stern, Naoum Dinger, Bernard Greenhouse, Nathan Stutch, Esther Gruhn
Double Bass: Anselm Fortier, Robert Brennand
Flute: John Wummer, Frederick Wilkins, Benjamin Gaskins
Oboe: Robert Bloom, Marc Lifschey, Mitch Miller
Clarinet: David Oppenheim, Luigi Cancellieri (one session only), Alexander Williams
Bassoon: William Polisi, Manuel Zegler
French Horn: James Chambers, William Namen, Joseph Singer, Robert H. Schulze, Luigi Ricci
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, Isidore Blank, James Smith
Trombone: Gordon Pulis, Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander
Tuba: William Bell    Timpani: Saul Goodman
Percussion: Carroll Bratman, Walter Rosenberger (three sessions)
Harp: Theodore Cella    Piano: Leo Smit (one session only)

 

RCA recording sheets for Stokowski‘s 1947 recording of Dvořák’s "New World" Symphony are particularly revealing. The first movement was done on 10 December, the other three on 12 December. Mitch Miller joined for the English horn solo in the Largo. Miller had played in several previous sessions and been paid union scale ($55.00 for a three-and-a-half-hour session); for the Dvořák solo, he was paid $80, equal to that of concertmaster John Corigliano. Most surprising is the size of the ensemble: eight first violins, six second violins, four violas, four celli, and two double basses; each section is less than half the size of its counterpart in major symphony orchestras of the day. That anomaly continued throughout these "His Orchestra" recordings of the standard repertoire (Stokowski soon added a third double bass). Richard Mohr, who would produce most of these recordings, said "Stokowski had that unique knack of making it sound as though it were 18-16-14-12-10" 3, but some critics disagreed, finding the orchestra thin and underpowered. On the Dvořák roster, the musicians are all from the New York Philharmonic, except for fifteen free-lancers, whose names are italicized. No member of the NBC Symphony is present (violinist Philip Frank of the NBC played in the 11 December session, NBC Flutist Arthur Lora on 30 December).

Stokowski Farrell

Eileen Farrell with Leopold Stokowski and RCA recording director Richard Gilbert during recording of the Five Wesendonck Lieder in December 1947

A: 9 December 1947 Liszt: Les preludes
B: 10, 12 December 1947 Dvorak: Symphony no 9 'From the New World'
C: 11 December 1947 Silvestre Revueltas (1899-1940): Sensemayá (1937)
Granados: Goyescas opus 11
Sibelius: Lemminkäinen Suite: "The Swan of Tuonela"
D: 30 December 1947 Wagner: Wesendonck Lieder (Eileen Farrell soprano)
Violin I: John Corigliano (ABC), Michael Rosenker, Frank Gullino, David Rosensweig, Michael de Stefano, Maximilian Pilzer, Louis Gabowitz, George Rabin (ACD), Jeanne Mitchell (BCD)
Violin II: Imre Pogany, Arthur Schuller, Armand Neveux, Morris Kreiselman, Jacques Neiblum, David Kulinyi, Philip Frank (C)
Viola: Lillian Stein (ABC), Walter Trampler, Joseph Vieland, David Kates (ABD), William Lincer (CD)
Cello: Leonard Rose (ABC), Carl Stern, Bernard Greenhouse (ACD), Naoum Dinger (BD), Esther Gruhn
Double Bass: Anselm Fortier, Robert Brennand (AB), Joseph De Angelis (CD)
Flute: John Wummer (ABC), Frederick Wilkins, F. William Heim (C), Ben Gaskins (ABC), Arthur Lora (D)
Oboe: Robert Bloom, Ralph Gomberg (BCD)    English horn: Mitch Miller (AC, 12 December)
Clarinet: David Oppenheim, Alexander Williams, Leo Lakritz (C)    Bass Clarinet: Leonard Schaller (C).
Bassoon: William Polisi, Manuel Zegler, Loren Glickman (C)
French Horn: James Chambers, William Namen, Luigi Ricci, Joseph Singer (ABC), Marcus Fischer
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, Nathan Prager, James Smith (C), Arthur C. Statter (C)
Trombone (ABC): Gordon Pulis, Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander
Tuba: William Bell (AC, 10 December), Herbert Wekselblatt (12 December)    Timpani: Saul Goodman (ABC)
Percussion: Carroll Bratman (ABC), Walter Rosenberger (AC), Samuel Borodkin (C)
Harp: Theodore Cella (AC)

There were five sessions in 1949. The orchestra now consisted almost entirely of members of the New York Philharmonic, with a nearly identical roster for all five sessions: No members of the NBC Symphony and only four freelancers are present (Walter Hendl was Assistant Conductor of the Philharmonic at this time).

WDM-1327

RCA WDM 1327 45 RPM album

A: 2 March 1949 Tchaikovsky: Nutcracker: Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy
Mozart: German Dances K.605: no 1 "Sleigh Ride"
Debussy orchestrated by André Caplet: Children’s Corner Suite (1-3)
B: 30 March 1949 Debussy orchestrated by André Caplet: Children’s Corner Suite (4-6)
Schubert: 16 German Dances opus 33: Tyrolean Dances - Stokowski arrangement
C: 5 May 1949 Haydn Symphony no 53 "Impériale"
D: 22 September 1949 Humperdinck: Hansel and Gretel: Act I Prelude
Johann Strauss II: Tales from the Vienna Woods, Blue Danube Waltz
E: 4 October 1949 Debussy: Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun
Sibelius: Valse triste
Violin I: John Corigliano, Michael Rosenker, Frank Gullino, David Rosensweig, Michael de Stefano, George Rabin, Ralph Henkle, William Dembinsky, Leopold Busch, Joachim Fishberg
Violin II: Imre Pogany, Arthur Schuller, Armand Neveux, Morris Kreiselman, Leon Rudin, Socrate Barozzi
Viola: William Lincer, George Morgulis, David Kates, Raymond Sabinsky
Cello: Leonard Rose, Carl Stern, Naoum Dinger, George Feher
Double Bass: Anselm Fortier, Joseph De Angelis (ACDE), Robert Brennand (BDE)
Flute: John Wummer, Amedeo Ghignatti (ABDE)    Piccolo: Benjamin Gaskins (ABDE)
Oboe: Robert Bloom, Englebert Brenner    English horn: Michel Nazzi (ABDE)
Clarinet (ABDE): Robert McGinnis, Napoleon Cerminara, Stanley Drucker (B)    Bass Clarinet: Leonard Schaller (A).
Bassoon: William Polisi, Manuel Zegler
French Horn: James Chambers, William Namen (ABDE), Joseph Singer (ABCD), Marcus Fischer (ABDE), Rodney Brown (D), Ross W. Taylor (E)
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, Nathan Prager, John Ware (A)
Trombone (ABC): Gordon Pulis, Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander
Tuba (D): William Bell    Timpani: Saul Goodman
Percussion: Samuel Borodkin (A), Arthur A. Layfield (A), William Dorn (AB), Walter Rosenberger (E), Elden Bailey (E)
Harp: Theodore Cella (ABDE), Florence Wightman (E)    Celesta: Walter Hendl (A).

There were 29 sessions in 1950. The first five are still nearly all-Philharmonic: Frank Miller, NBC cellist, appears on 24 March.

 

Victor LM 1066

Victor LM 1066 Tannhäuser (Paris version): Act I Prelude & Bacchanale

A: 1 February 1950 Wagner: Tannhauser: Preludes to Acts I and III
B: 8 February 1950 Borodin: Prince Igor: "Polovtsian Dances": labeled "Dances of the Polovetzki Maidens" (with chorus)
C: 15 February 1950 Wagner: Tannhauser: Prelude to Act I; Venusberg Music (with chorus)
D: 15 March 1950 Sibelius: The Tempest opus 109: Berceuse
Three Bach transcriptions
E: 24 March 1950 Bach-Stokowski: Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor BWV 582
Bach-Stokowski: English Suite No 2 BWV 807: Bourée
Violin I: John Corigliano, Michael Rosenker, Frank Gullino (ABCD), David Rosensweig, Michael de Stefano (ABCD), George Rabin (ABCD), Ralph Henkle, William Dembinsky, Leopold Busch, Joachim Fishberg, Antonio Gerardi (E), Leon Temerson (E), Louis Fishzohn (E)
Violin II: Imre Pogany, Arthur Schuller, Armand Neveux, Morris Kreiselman, Leon Rudin, Socrate Barozzi
Viola: William Lincer, George Morgulis, David Kates (ABCD), Sabinsky, Joseph Fick (E)
Cello: Leonard Rose (ABC), Frank Miller (E), Carl Stern, Naoum Dinger (ABCD), Nathan Stutch, Anthony Sophos (DE).
Double Bass: Anselm Fortier (ABCE), Joseph De Angelis, Robert Brennand
Flute: John Wummer, Amedeo Ghignatti, Ben Gaskins
Oboe (ABCE): Robert Bloom, Englebert Brenner    English horn: Michel Nazzi (BE)
Clarinet: Robert McGinnis, Napoleon Cerminara (ABCE)    Bass Clarinet: Leonard Schaller (E).
Bassoon (ABCE): William Polisi, Frank Ruggieri    Contra-bassoon: Roberto Sensale (E)
French Horn (ABCE): James Chambers, William Namen, Joseph Singer, Marcus Fischer, Ross W. Taylor
Trumpet: William Vacchiano (ABCE), Nathan Prager (ABCE), John Ware (AC), Carmine Fornarotto (E)
Trombone (ABCE): Gordon Pulis, Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander
Tuba (D): William Bell    Timpani: Saul Goodman
Percussion: Carroll Bratman (BC), Walter Rosenberger (BC), Elden Bailey (BC)    Harp (BCD): Theodore Cella

The next four sessions saw nine new players from the Philharmonic and three (Philip Frank, Harry Glickman, and Herman Weinberg) from the NBC Symphony:

Heart of the Ballet

Victor LM-1083 "Heart of the Ballet": Delibes, Adam, Chopin, Tchaikovsky, Berlioz

A: 25 April 1950 Bach-Stokowski: Partita no 2 BWV 1004: Chaconne
B: 9 May 1950 Weber: Invitation to the Dance
Tchaikovsky: The Nutcracker Suite, Op 71a: Waltz of the Flowers
C: 11 May 1950 Chopin selections as orchestrated by Leroy Anderson and Peter Bodge: "Les Sylphides"
Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake: Dance of the Swan Queen
D: 16 May 1950 Léo Delibes: Sylvia: Valse Lent, Pizzicato Polka
Adolphe Adam: Giselle: Act I finale
Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake: Dance of the Cygnets
Violin I: John Corigliano (ABC), Michael Rosenker, Frank Gullino, David Rosensweig (A), Ralph Henkle (A), William Dembinsky, Antonio Gerardi, Louis Fishzohn, Leon Rudin, Isidor Strassner (A), Louis Gabowitz (BCD), Philip Frank (BCD), Alfred Breuning (BCD), Harry Glickman (D).
Violin II: Imre Pogany (A), Jeanne Mitchell (BCD), Armand Neveux, Socrate Barozzi, Max Weiner, Alfio Micci, Bjoern Andreasson (ABD), Herman Weinberg (C)
Viola: William Lincer, Sabinsky, Harry Zaratzian, Leonard Davis
Cello: Carl Stern, Naoum Dinger, Nathan Stutch, Laszlo Varga
Double Bass: Anselm Fortier (A), Joseph De Angelis, Robert Brennand, Carlo Raviola (BCD)
Flute: John Wummer (AB), Amedeo Ghignatti (ABD). Heim (A), Wilkins (CD), Ben Gaskins (C)
Oboe: Robert Bloom, Englebert Brenner (A), Whitney Tustin (BCD)    English horn: Nazzi (A)
Clarinet: David Oppenheim (ABD), McGinnis (C), Cerminara    Bass Clarinet: Leonard Schaller (A)
Bassoon: William Polisi, Frank Ruggieri    Contra-bassoon: Roberto Sensale (A)
French Horn: John Barrows (ABD), James Chambers (C), William Namen, Domenico Caputo (ABD), Taylor, Marcus Fischer (C).
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, Nathan Prager    Trombone: Gordon Pulis, Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander
Tuba: William Bell (ABC)    Percussion: Carroll Bratman (CD)    Harp: Lucille Lawrence (BCD)

 

In the next two sessions. Philip Frank is the only NBC member:

LM-9029 Firebird

Victor LM-9029 of the 1919 Firebird suite and His Master's Voice issue of Grainger

A: 24 May 1950 Stravinsky: The Firebird ballet (1919 version) as arranged by Stokowski - beginning (see 7 June 1950)
B: 31 May 1950 Percy Grainger: "Molly on the Shore", "Handel in the Strand" (Percy Grainger piano), "Mock Morris", "Shepherd's Hey" (Percy Grainger piano), "Country Gardens" (Percy Grainger piano)
note: "My Robin is to the green wood gone" with Grainger at the piano was also recorded, but not released
Violin I: John Corigliano (A), Michael Rosenker, Frank Gullino, William Dembinsky, Antonio Gerardi, Louis Fishzohn, Leon Rudin, Alfred Breuning, Hugo Kolberg, Louis Gabowitz, Philip Frank (A)
Violin II: Victor Aitay, Armand Neveux, Max Weiner, Alfio Micci, Socrate Barozzi, Bjoern Andreasson (A), Bernice Stochek (B)
Viola: William Lincer, Sabinsky, Harry Zaratzian, Leonard Davis
Cello: Lazlo Varga, Carl Stern, Leonard Rose (B), Nathan Stutch, Heinrich Joachim (A)
Double Bass: Joseph De Angelis, Robert Brennand, Carlo Raviola
Flute: Harold Bennett, Ben Gaskins , Amedeo Ghignatti (B)
Oboe: Robert Bloom, Whitney Tustin    English horn: Nazzi (B)
Clarinet: David Oppenheim, Cerminara    Bass Clarinet: George Roedelberger (B)
Bassoon: William Polisi, Frank Ruggieri    Contra-bassoon: Hugo Burghauser (B)
French Horn: John Barrows, William Namen, Domenico Caputo, Taylor
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, Nathan Prager, John Ware (B)    Trombone: Gordon Pulis, Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander
Tuba: William Bell    Timpani: Alfred Howard
Percussion: Carroll Bratman, Walter Rosenberger (B)    Harp:Lucille Lawrence
Piano: Arthur Schuller (A), Percy Grainger (B)

Philip Frank, Isidore Gussikov, Sabatanio Masucci, and Laura Newell are the only NBC members in the next four sessions. Julius Baker and Carmine Fornarotto were freelancers who would later join the Philharmonic.

Victor LM-1175

Victor LM-1175 Petrushka

A: 7 June 1950 Stravinsky: The Firebird ballet (1919 version) as arranged by Stokowski - conclusion

 

beautiful bassoon solo in the "Berceuse" movement by William Polisi

B: 29 June 1950 Tchaikovsky: suite from the Nutcrackeropus 71a: as selected by Stokowski: Ouverture miniature, Marche, Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy, Trepak - Danse russe, Arabian Dance, Chinese Dance, Dance of the Flutes, Waltz of the Flowers
C: 30 June 1950,
  5 July 1950
Stravinsky: Petrushka ballet (1911 version) as arranged by Stokowski
Violin I: John Corigliano, Michael Rosenker (AC), Frank Gullino, William Dembinsky, Antonio Gerardi, Louis Fishzohn, Leon Rudin, Hugo Kolberg, Louis Gabowitz, Philip Frank
Violin II: Victor Aitay, Armand Neveux, Max Weiner, Alfio Micci, Bernice Stochek, Joyce Flissler
Viola: William Lincer, Sabinsky, Harry Zaratzian (BC), Walter Trampler (A), Nicholas Biro, Harold Colletta (BC)
Cello: Lazlo Varga, Leonard Rose, Isidore Gussikov, Chales McCracken
Double Bass: Joseph De Angelis, Robert Brennand, Carlo Raviola
Flute: Harold Bennett (A), Ben Gaskins, Amedeo Ghignatti (BC), Julius Baker (BC)
Oboe: Robert Bloom, Whitney Tustin, Englebert Brenner (BC)
Clarinet: David Oppenheim, Cerminara, McGinnis (C)    Bass Clarinet: George Roedelberger (B)
Bassoon: William Polisi, Frank Ruggieri    Contra-bassoon: Sabatino Masucci (C)
French Horn: John Barrows, William Namen, James Chambers, Marcus Fischer, Joseph Singer (C)
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, Nathan Prager, John Ware (C)    Trombone: Gordon Pulis, Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander
Tuba: William Bell    Timpani: Alfred Howard
Percussion: Carroll Bratman, Walter Rosenberger (C)    Harp:Lucille Lawrence, Laura Newell (B)
Piano: Maximilian Pilzer (A), Leonid Hambro (C)    Celesta: Maximilian Pilzer (BC)

 

For the following six sessions, the NBC members are Philip Frank, Sylvan Shulman, Harry Glickman, Isidore Gussikov, and Sabatino Masucci. Note that oboist Robert Bloom was absent from these sessions.

Victor LM-1125

Victor LM-1125 Sibelius Symphony no 1

A: 11, 13 July 1950 Sibelius: Symphony no 1 E Minor opus 39 (1899)
B: 18, 21 July 1950 Schumann: Symphony no 2 in C major opus 61 as arranged by Stokowski
C: 25 July 1950 Bach-Stokowski: "Little" Fugue in G minor, BWV 578
Bach-Stokowski: Fantasia and Fugue in G minor BWV 542: "Great" Fugue
Bach-Stokowski: Chorale, "Komm, süßer Tod, komm selge Ruh", BWV 478 ("Come Sweet Death")
D: 8 August 1950 Bach-Stokowski: Cantata BWV 147: Chorale "Jesu bleibet meine Freude" (1716) labeled "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring"
Bach-Stokowski: Chorale from the Easter Cantata BWV 4 "Jesus Christus, Gottes Sohn"
Purcell-Stokowski: "Dido and Aeneas": Dido's Lament: "When I am laid in earth" (not released by Victor)
Violin I: John Corigliano, Michael Rosenker, Hugo Kolberg, Philip Frank, Louis Gabowitz, Louis Fishzohn, Leon Rudin, Lywen, Sylvan Shulman (ABD), Harry Zarief (CD), Harry Glickman (C)
Violin II: Victor Aitay (A), Orlando Barera, Armand Neveux, Joyce Flissler, Max Weiner, Alfio Micci, Bernice Stochek
Viola: Nicholas Biro, Harold Colletta, Leon Frengut, John DiJanni
Cello: Lazlo Varga (11 July), Robert Jamieson (13 July, BCD), Leonard Rose, Isidore Gussikov, Charles McCracken
Double Bass: Joseph De Angelis, Robert Brennand, Carlo Raviola
Flute: Murray Graitzer, Ben Gaskins
Oboe: Whitney Tustin, Englebert Brenner (ABC)    English horn: Ralph Gomberg (CD)
Clarinet: McGinnis (ABC), Sidney Keil (A), Cerminara (B), George Roedelberger (CD)
Bassoon: William Polisi, Frank Ruggieri    Contra-bassoon: Sabatino Masucci (C)
French Horn: James Chambers, William Namen, John Barrows (AC), Marcus Fischer (ACD)
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, Nathan Prager (ABC), John Ware (A)
Trombone: Gordon Pulis, Lewis von Haney (ABC), Allen Ostrander (ABC) (no trombones on 21 July)
Tuba: William Bell (ACD)    Timpani: Alfred Howard (AB)
Percussion: Carroll Bratman (A)    Harp:Lucille Lawrence (AC)

This Bach Suite has only five Philharmonic members, four at first desks. There are six NBC players: Philip Frank, Shulman, Glickman, Isidore Gussikov, Philip Sklar, and Walter Botti.

Victor LM-1875

the Bach-Stokowski Sarabande was included in the Victor album "Restful Good Music"

12, 14 September 1950 Bach-Stokowski: Orchestral Suite no 2 in B Minor, BWV 1067: 'Sarabande' - Julius Baker solo flute
Violin I: John Corigliano, Hugo Kolberg, Stuart Canin, Philip Frank, Lywen, Louis Gabowitz, Shulman, Harry Glickman (September 12), Harry Zarief (September 14)
Violin II: Victor Aitay, Orlando Barera, Inez Lauritano, Joyce Flissler, Sandor Balint, Bernice Stochek
Viola: William Lincer, Nicholas Biro, Frengut, John DiJanni
Cello: Leonard Rose, Laszlo Varga, Isidore Gussikov, Charles McCracken
Double Bass: Joseph De Angelis, Philip Sklar, Walter Botti
Flute: Julius Baker solo flute
Harpsichord: Claude Jean Chiasson (Chiasson was also a builder of harpsichords 4)

 

The next sessions includes NBC members Philip Frank and Isidore Gussikov

Victor LM-1174

Victor LM-1174 Tristan & Isolde

 

Edward Johnson and Andrew Roser for Pristine Classical have made a fine restoration of Tristan und Isolde on PASC167.

A: 11 October 1950 Debussy: Nocturnes (1899): Nuages, Fêtes
B: 17 October 1950 Wagner: Tristan und Isolde Stokowski Symphonic Synthesis (longer): Act 1 Prelude, Act I excerpt
C: 18 October 1950 Wagner: Tristan und Isolde Stokowski Symphonic Synthesis (longer): Act II Liebesnacht
Violin I: John Corigliano (A), Michael Rosenker (A), Hugo Kolberg, Philip Frank, Louis Gabowitz, Inez Lauritano, Lywen, Leon Rudin, Harry Zarief (BC), Herbert Baumel (BC)
Violin II: Victor Aitay (A), Arthur Schuller, Orlando Barera, Armand Neveux, Hugo Fiorato, Sandor Balint
Viola: William Lincer, Walter Trampler, Nicholas Biro, John DiJanni
Cello: Leonard Rose, Isidore Gussikov, Bernard Greenhouse, Esther Gruhn
Double Bass: Joseph De Angelis, Robert Brennand, Carlo Raviola
Flute: Baker, Amedeo Ghignatti, Ben Gaskins.
Oboe: Robert Bloom, Whitney Tustin    English horn: William Criss
Clarinet: McGinnis, Cerminara    Bass Clarinet: George Roedelberger (BC)
Bassoon: William Polisi, Frank Ruggieri, Loren Glickman
French Horn: James Chambers, William Namen, Marcus Fischer, Joseph Singer, John Barrows (BC)
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, Robert Nagel John Ware    Trombone: Gordon Pulis, Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander
Tuba: William Bell    Timpani: Saul Goodman
Percussion: Carroll Bratman (A)    Harp:Lucille Lawrence, Florence Wightman (A)

The final three sessions of 1950 include four NBC Symphony members: Philip Frank, Frank Miller, Isidore Gussikov, and Sabatino Masucci.

Victor LM-1154

Victor LM-1154 Debussy Nocturnes

A: 8 November 1950 Grainger: "Early one morning", "Irish Tune from County Derry" (Londonderry Air)
Chopin-Stokowski: Prelude in E minor, opus 28 no 4
Chopin-Stokowski: Prelude in D minor, opus 28 no 24
B: 9 November 1950 Bach-Stokowski: Cantata no 140: Wachet auf! ruft uns die Stimme ("Sleepers Awake!") (not issued by Victor)
Wagner: Tristan und Isolde Stokowski Symphonic Synthesis (longer): Act III excerpt, Liebestod
C: 10 November 1950 Debussy: Nocturnes: no 3: Sirènes with Robert Shaw Chorale women's voices
Violin I: Hugo Kolberg, Philip Frank, Louis Gabowitz, Herbert Baumel, Richard Leshin (AB), Harry Zarief (C), Inez Lauritano, Leon Temerson, Leon Rudin, Max Weiner
Violin II: Arthur Schuller, Orlando Barera, Armand Neveux, Fiorato, Sandor Balint
Viola: William Lincer, Walter Trampler, Nicholas Biro, Theodore Israel (AB), Harold Colletta (C)
Cello: Frank Miller, Isidore Gussikov (AB), Charles McCracken (C), Bernard Greenhouse, Esther Gruhn
Double Bass: Joseph De Angelis, Robert Brennand, Carlo Raviola
Flute: Baker, Amedeo Ghignatti, Ben Gaskins    Piccolo: Ben Gaskins (BC).
Oboe: Robert Bloom, Whitney Tustin    English horn: Englebert Brenner
Clarinet: McGinnis, Cerminara    Bass Clarinet: Keil (AB)
Bassoon: William Polisi, Frank Ruggieri, Sabatino Masucci (B), Zegler (C)
French Horn: James Chambers, William Namen, Marcus Fischer, Joseph Singer, John Barrows (B)
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, John Ware, Robert Nagel (BC)    Trombone: Gordon Pulis (with solo in A), Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander
Euphonium (A): Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander    Tuba: William Bell
Timpani: Elayne Jones (BC) - this may have been the first engagement in Elayne Jones's long career with Stokowski
Percussion: Rosenberger (AC)    Harp:Lucille Lawrence (BC), Florence Wightman (C)

 

On 8 February 1951, at Manhattan Center, Licia Albanese recorded Villa-Lobos’s Bachianas Brasileiras no 5, with Stokowski conducting eight cellists. This was not "His Symphony Orchestra" and is not so identified on the session log. For the record, the cellists were: Frank Miller (solo), Bernard Greenhouse, Harvey Shapiro, Laszlo Varga, Isudore Gussikov, Charles McCracken, Esther Gruhn, and Bernardo Altmann.

Grainger

Victor LM-142 10 inch (25 cm) LP: Villa-Lobos and Tchaikovsky: "Eugene Onegin"

 

For the two "His Orchestra" sessions of 1951, the NBC Symphony members are Philip Frank and Sylvan Shulman, violin; Frank Miller and Harvey Shapiro, cello.

Victor LM-151 Esales

Victor LM-151 10 inch (25 cm) LP: Esales

A: 6 February 1951 Tchaikovsky: "Eugene Onegin" opus 24: Act I: "Letter Scene" - Licia Albanese soprano
B: 15 February 1951 Ibert: Escales suite (1922)
Berlioz Damnation of Faust: Dance of the Sylphs
Violin I: Philip Frank, Hugo Kolberg (A), Louis Gabowitz, Herbert Baumel, Frank Scocozza (A), Inez Lauritano, Leon Rudin, Leon Temerson, Isidore Cohen, Aitay (A), Shulman(B), Michael Kuttner (B)
Violin II: Arthur Schuller (doubling Celesta in B), Armand Neveux, Sandor Balint, Canin, Scocozza (B)
Viola: William Lincer, Walter Trampler, Nicholas Biro, John DiJanni (A), Harold Colletta (B)
Cello: Frank Miller (A), Bernard Greenhouse (A), Leonard Rose (B), Laszlo Varga, Harvey Shapiro (B), Bernardo Altman
Double Bass: Joseph De Angelis, Robert Brennand, Carlo Raviola
Flute: Baker, Amedeo Ghignatti (B), Ben Gaskins
Oboe: Robert Bloom, Whitney Tustin    English horn: Englebert Brenner (B)
Clarinet: McGinnis, Cerminara    Bassoon: William Polisi, Frank Ruggieri, L. Glickman (B)
French Horn: James Chambers, William Namen, Marcus Fischer, Joseph Singer
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, John Ware, Robert Nagel (B)    Trombone: Gordon Pulis, Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander
Tuba: William Bell    Timpani: Goodman (B)    Celesta: Arthur Schuller (B)
Percussion: Rosenberger (B), Alfred Howard (B)    Harp:Lucille Lawrence, Florence Wightman (B)

1952 would see a typical Stokowski mix of popular and esoteric repertoire. Philip Frank, Oscar Shumsky, and Harvey Shapiro represent NBC in the first four sessions:

Victor LM 1706

Victor LM 1706 L'Arlésienne Suite

A: 1 February 1952 Schoenberg: Verklärte Nacht (1899)
B: 28 February 1952 Schoenberg: Verklärte Nacht (1899)
Antonio Cesti (1623-1669): Tu mancavi a tormentarmi - Stokowski transcription
Vivaldi-Stokowski: L'estro armonico: Concerto grosso opus 3 no 11: 2. Largo (also see 21 March, 4 April 1952)
C: 29 February 1952 Bizet: L'Arlésienne Suite no 1 and Suite no 2

including minuet from La Jolie Fille de Perth as arranged by Stokowski

D: 5 March 1952 Bizet: L'Arlésienne Suite no 1 and Suite no 2
Violin I: Philip Frank (AB), Oscar Shumsky (D), Louis Gabowitz, Herbert Baumel, Inez Lauritano, Leon Temerson, Leon Rudin, Cohen (ABC), Harry Zarief (ABC), Kuttner, Alfred Breuning (CD), Helen Shomer (D)
Violin II: Arthur Schuller, Armand Neveux, Yvonne de Casafuerte, Sandor Balint, Scocozza (A), Aitay (B), Marilyn Wright (CD)
Viola: William Lincer, Walter Trampler (AB), Nicholas Biro, Israel (A), John DiJanni (B), Leonard Davis (CD), Harry Zaratzian (CD)
Cello: Leonard Rose, Laszlo Varga, Harvey Shapiro, Charles McCracken
Double Bass: Joseph De Angelis, Robert Brennand, Carlo Raviola
Flute: James Politis (C), Ben Gaskins (C), Harold Bennett (D)
Oboe: Bloom (BCD), Richard Nass (CD, and doubling on English horn)

 

The following musicians appear only in sessions C and D:

Clarinet: Robert McGinnis, Napoleon Cerminara    Bassoon: William Polisi, Frank Ruggieri    Alto saxophone: Joseph Allard
French Horn: James Chambers, William Namen, Marcus Fischer, Joseph Singer
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, John Ware, Theodore Weiss, Isidor Blank (C), Harry Freistadt (D)
Trombone: Gordon Pulis, Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander    Timpani: Saul Goodman    Harp: Myor Rosen

 

A March 1952 session was devoted to Giovanni Gabrieli brass music. A recording log appears in the "Stokowski and His Symphony Orchestra" folder, but the ensemble is identified there and on records simply as "Brass Choir and Chorus."

 

Cellist Harvey Shapiro represents NBC in the next three orchestral sessions.

Victor LM 1721

Victor LM 1721 Stokowski transcriptions of Italian baroque music

 

Mark Obert-Thorn has made a fine restorations these recordings for Pristine Classical on PASC391.

A: 20 March 1952 Bizet: Symphony in C (1855): movements 1, 2

a beautiful oboe solo by Robert Bloom in second movement

B: 21 March 1952 Bizet: Symphony in C (1855): movements 3, 4
Vivaldi-Stokowski: L'estro armonico: Concerto grosso opus 3 no 11: 1. Allegro
C: 4 April 1952 Vivaldi-Stokowski: L'estro armonico: Concerto grosso opus 3 no 11: 3. Allegro
Frescobaldi-Stokowski: Libro delle Gagliarde no 2: Gagliarda
Lully: Le Triomphe de l’Amour: Nocturne and Thésèe: March
Violin I: Louis Gabowitz, Herbert Baumel, Harry Zarief (AB), Aitay (C), Inez Lauritano, Leon Temerson, Leon Rudin, Alfred Breuning, Helen Shomer
Violin II: Kuttner, Arthur Schuller, Armand Neveux, Casafuerte, Sandor Balint, Marilyn Wright
Viola: William Lincer, Walter Trampler (AB), John DiJanni (C), Nicholas Biro, Harry Zaratzian
Cello: Leonard Rose, Laszlo Varga, Harvey Shapiro, Charles McCracken
Double Bass: Joseph De Angelis, Robert Brennand, Carlo Raviola
Flute: James Politis (AB), Harold Bennett (C), Ben Gaskins
Oboe: Bloom, Englebert Brenner    English horn: Richard Nass (BC)
Clarinet: Robert McGinnis, Napoleon Cerminara    Bass Clarinet: Keil (B)
Bassoon: William Polisi, Frank Ruggieri (AB)    Contra-bassoon: Zegler (BC)
French Horn: James Chambers, William Namen (AB), Marcus Fischer (AB), Joseph Singer
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, John Ware    Trombone: Gordon Pulis, Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander
Tuba: William Bell (BC)    Timpani: Saul Goodman (AB)

Oliver Daniel states 5 that Roger Goeb’s Symphony no 3, recorded on 29 April 1952, was played by the "augmented CBS Symphony," which had performed it at a new-music festival on 27 April, but that RCA labeled it "Leopold Stokowski and His Symphony Orchestra." This makes musical and economic sense, but this session report rounds up the usual suspects: 33 from the New York Philharmonic and 14 freelancers; cellist Harvey Shapiro is the lone NBC member. This does not necessarily contradict Daniel; that CBS radio ensemble, like Stokowski’s orchestra, was a conglomerate of New York musicians. But see 29 October 1952 for a situation that fits Daniel’s statement more closely.

Victor LM 1727

Victor LM-1727 Roger Goeb: Symphony no 3

29 April 1952 Roger Goeb (1914-1997): Symphony no 3 (1950) - Stokowski gave the premiere on 27 April 1952
Violin I: Louis Gabowitz, Herbert Baumel, Frank Gullino, Broadus Erle, Jeanne Mitchell, Leon Temerson, Inez Lauritano, Leon Rudin
Violin II: David Rosensweig, Arthur Schuller, Armand Neveux, Matthew Raimondi, Bjoern Andreasson, Nathan Snader
Viola: William Lincer, Walter Trampler, Harold Colletta, Leonard Davis
Cello: Laszlo Varga, Harvey Shapiro, Claus Adam, Nathan Stutch
Double Bass: Joseph De Angelis, Robert Brennand, Carlo Raviola
Flute: Baker, Chignatti, Ben Gaskins
Oboe: Bloom, Robert Lehrfeld    English horn: Englebert Brenner
Clarinet: Robert McGinnis, Napoleon Cerminara    Bass Clarinet: Keil
Bassoon: William Polisi, Frank Ruggieri
French Horn: James Chambers, William Namen, Marcus Fischer, Joseph Singer
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, John Ware, Fornarotto    Trombone: Gordon Pulis, Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander
Tuba: William Bell    Timpani: Saul Goodman    Percussion: Rosenberger, Alvin Broemel, Bailey

 

For the Tallis Fantasia, Stokowski beefed up the lower strings with NBC cellist Harvey Shapiro and two bassists, the NBC’s Gerald Fiore and Walter Botti, who had left the NBC Symphony and joined the Philharmonic (where he would play for 50 years).

Victor LM 1739

Victor LM-1739 the Vaughan Williams Fantasia coupled with Schoenberg: Verklärte Nacht

3 September 1952 Vaughan Williams: Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis (1910)
Violin I: Louis Gabowitz, Herbert Baumel, Lywen, Inez Lauritano, Alfred Breuning, Helen Shomer, Marilyn Wright, Sandor Balint
Violin II: Aitay, Leon Rudin, David Rosensweig, Armand Neveux, Casafuerte, Arthur Schuller
Viola: William Lincer, Leonard Davis, Nicholas Biro, Harry Zaratzian, John DiJanni, Harold Colletta
Cello: Leonard Rose, Harvey Shapiro, Bernard Greenhouse, Esther Gruhn, Laszlo Varga, Sims
Double Bass: Joseph De Angelis, Robert Brennand, Botti, Gerald Fiore

 

Recording sheets for neither Parsifal session list the players, payment sheets have not survived, and Local 802 of the AFM has long since discarded documents from this era, so we may never discover who played here, except that Louis Gabowitz was concertmaster. The instrumentation was: 13 violins, 4 violas, 4 cellos, 3 basses, 3 flutes, 2 oboes, English horn, 2 clarinets, bass clarinet, 2 bassoons, contrabassoon, 4 horns, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, and harp.

Victor LM 1721

Victor LM-1730 Parsifal

17 September 1952 Wagner Parsifal: Symphonic Synthesis, parts 3 and 4 as arranged by Stokowski
24 September 1952 Wagner Parsifal: Symphonic Synthesis, parts 1 and 2 as arranged by Stokowski

Three after-midnight sessions closed recordings for 1952. This was an orchestra contracted for a concert of these two works at the Museum of Modern Art on 28 October 1952, just hours before the first midnight recording session. Louis Sheebe was the contractor for the performances, and the sessions were held at the American Composer’s Alliance, 580 Fifth Avenue, in New York City. Oliver Daniel’s comment about the CBS Symphony (see 29 April 1952) would seem more appropriate here, as there are no Philharmonic members, only two (Harvey Shapiro and Robert E. Morris) from NBC, and no Robert Bloom. Furthermore, eleven of the thirteen freelancers - nine of whom never appear again - are newcomers to these Stokowski sessions.

CRI-114

Composer's Recordings CRI 114 of Harrison coupled with 1957 Henry Cowell 'Persian Set' (also issued on Victor LM-1785)

29 October 1952 Lou Harrison (1917-2003): Suite for Violin, Piano, and Small Orchestra (Anahid Ajemian, violin; Maro Ajemian, piano)
I. Overture
II. Elegy
III. First Gamelan
IV. Aria
V. Second Gamelan
VI. Chorale
Cello: Harvey Shapiro, George Ricci
Double Bass: Jesse Teiko
Flute: Robert E. Morris, Murray Panitz
Oboe: Jerome Roth    Percussion: Carroll Bratman
Piano: William Masselos    Celeste: Jascha Zayde    Harp:Gloria Agostini

 

Victor LM-1785

Victor LM-1785 Ben Weber coupled with Lou Harrison

30, 31 October 1952 Ben Weber (1916-1979): Symphony on Poems of William Blake (Warren Galjour, baritone)
- To Autumn
- Never Seek To Tell Thy Love
- Mad Song
- To Spring
Cello: George Ricci
Double Bass: Jesse Teiko
Flute: Murray Panitz
Oboe: Jerome Roth    Clarinet: David Glazer, Vincent Abato
Bassoon: Bernard Garfield    French Horn: John Barrows    Trombone: Erwin Price
Timpani: Alfred Howard    Percussion: Carroll Bratman
Celeste: Jascha Zayde    Harp:Gloria Agostini

James Chambers plays the French horn solo in the Andante cantabile of Tchaikovsky’s Fifth. The NBC members are Emanuel Vardi and Harvey Shapiro. Ben Gaskins left the Philharmonic in 1952 and was now a freelancer. Who played on which day is not specified; *denotes one session, **means two sessions.

HMV FALP-104

French HMV FALP-104

 

Edward Johnson and Andrew Roser for Pristine Classical have made a fine restoration of the Tchaikovsky: Symphony no 5 on PASC188.

10, 12, 13 February 1953 Tchaikovsky: Symphony no 5 in E minor, opus 64
Violin I: Louis Gabowitz, Herbert Baumel, Lywen*, Erle, Leon Rudin, Cohen, Alfred Breuning, Helen Shomer, David Rosensweig
Violin II: Arthur Schuller, Armand Neveux, Marilyn Wright, Sandor Balint, Kuttner, Harry Zarieff**, Milton Lomask*
Viola: William Lincer, Emanuel Vardi, Leonard Davis, Nicholas Biro, Walter Trampler*, Harry Zaratzian**
Cello: Leonard Rose, Laszlo Varga, Harvey Shapiro**, Charles McCracken, Bernard Greenhouse*
Double Bass: Joseph De Angelis, Robert Brennand, Carlo Raviola
Flute: James Politis**, Chignatti, Ben Gaskins*, Harold Bennett*, Heim**
Oboe: Bloom, Criss**, William Arrowsmith*
Clarinet: Robert McGinnis, Napoleon Cerminara    Bassoon: Polisi, Ruggieri
French Horn: James Chambers (solo), William Namen, Marcus Fischer, Joseph Singer, Ranier De Intinis
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, John Ware    Trombone: Gordon Pulis, Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander
Tuba: William Bell    Timpani: Elayne Jones

 

For these February 1953 sessions, Max Hollander, Emanuel Vardi, Harvey Shapiro, and Harry Moskovitch are the NBCers.

HMV Mussorgsky Gliere

HMV Mussorgsky Gliere

A: 14 February 1953 Modest Mussorgsky: Night on Bare Mountain - Stokowski transcription
Glière: The Red Poppy: Russian Sailors' Dance
B: 25 February 1953 Tchaikovsky-Stokowski: song "Again, as Before, Alone" opus 73 no 6 titled "Solitude"
Tchaikovsky-Stokowski: Humoresque in G major, opus 10 no 2
Rachmaninoff-Stokowski: Vocalise opus 34 no 14 (1915)
C: 26 February 1953 Mussorgsky-Stokowski: Khovanchina: Act I: Prelude "Dawn on the Moscow River"
Mussorgsky-Stokowski: Khovanchina: Act IV: "Dance of the Persian Maidens"
Violin I: Louis Gabowitz, Herbert Baumel, Nadien, Max Pollikoff, Helen Shomer, Arthur Schuller, Sandor Balint, Kuttner (A), Renato Ladetto (BC)
Violin II: Harry Zarief (AC), Max Hollander (B), Leon Rudin, Alfred Breuning, David Rosensweig (A), Kuttner (BC), Armand Neveux, Marilyn Wright
Viola: William Lincer, Emanuel Vardi (AB), Leonard Davis (A), Walter Trampler (BC), Nicholas Biro, Harry Zaratzian (C)
Cello: Leonard Rose, Laszlo Varga, Harvey Shapiro, Charles McCracken
Double Bass: Joseph De Angelis, Robert Brennand, Carlo Raviola
Flute: James Politis (AB), Chignatti (A), Ben Gaskins (AB), Harold Bennett (C), Harry Moskovitch (C)    Piccolo: Heim (C)
Oboe: Bloom, Criss    English horn: Englebert Brenner (AC), Richard Nass (B)
Clarinet: Robert McGinnis, Napoleon Cerminara    Bass Clarinet: Allard (A)
Bassoon: William Polisi, Frank Ruggieri    Contra-bassoon: Zegler (A)
French Horn: James Chambers, William Namen, Joseph Singer, Marcus Fischer (AC), Ranier De Intinis (A)
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, John Ware, J. Smith (A)    Trombone: Gordon Pulis, Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander
Tuba: William Bell (BC)    Percussion: Rosenberger, Elayne Jones (A), Bailey (C)    Harp: Lucille Lawrence (AC)

There are six NBC members in these April 1953 sessions: Max Hollander, Emanuel Vardi, Frank Miller, Harvey Shapiro, Arthur Lora, and Harry Moskovitch.

RCA France Stokowski

RCA France 630 215 of Russian music

 

Edward Johnson and Andrew Roser for Pristine Classical have made a fine restoration of Tristan und Isolde on PASC167.

A: 8, 9 April 1953 Tchaikovsky: "Aurora's Wedding": Diaghilev's selections from The Sleeping Beauty ballet opus 66
B: 14 April 1953 Khovanshchina: Act IV scene 2 Entr'acte "Galitsin's Journey" In the Steppes of Central Asia
C: 16 April 1953 Rimsky-Korsakov: Russian Easter Overture opus 36 as transcribed by Stokowski with Nicola Moscona, bass, taking the hymn part usually scored for the trombone
D: 17 April 1953 Borodin: "From the Steppes of Central Asia"
Enescu: Roumanian Rhapsodies: no 2 in D major opus 11 no 2
Violin I: Louis Gabowitz, Herbert Baumel, Leon Rudin, Nadien (ABC), Hollander (D), Helen Shomer, Arthur Schuller, Sandor Balint, Renato Ladetto
Violin II: Aitay (A), Hollander (B), Raoul Poliakin (C), Harry Zarief (D), Max Pollikoff, Alfred Breuning, Kuttner, Armand Neveux, Marilyn Wright
Viola: William Lincer, Harry Zaratzian (A), John DiJanni (A), Nicholas Biro, Emanuel Vardi (BCD), David Schwartz (B), Ralph Mendelson (CD)
Cello: Frank Miller (A), Esther Gruhn, George Ricci (April 9,B), Harvey Shapiro (April 3,BD), Charles McCracken, Herman Busch (C)
Double Bass: Joseph De Angelis, Robert Brennand, Carlo Raviola
Flute: Arthur Lora, Harry Moskovitch, Ben Gaskins
Oboe: Bloom, Criss (A), Lehrfeld (BD), Ray Still (C)    English horn: Richard Nass (A), Ray Still (BD)
Clarinet: Robert McGinnis, Napoleon Cerminara    Bassoon: William Polisi, Frank Ruggieri
French Horn: James Chambers, William Namen, Joseph Singer, Marcus Fischer
Trumpet: William Vacchiano, John Ware    "Cornet à pistons" (Piston Cornet): Theodore Weiss (AB), Robert Nagel (AB)
Trombone: Gordon Pulis, Lewis von Haney, Allen Ostrander    Tuba (ABC): William Bell
Timpani: Goodman (AB), Bratman (C), Rosenberger (D)
Percussion: Rosenberger (ABC), Bailey    Harp: Lucille Lawrence (ABC), Rosen (D)

 

At the 1 October 1953 session, Stokowski abandoned the Philharmonic, even the double bass, trombone, and tuba players who had graced almost every previous session. There are now seven NBC Symphony men (Max Hollander, George Ciompi, Emanuel Vardi, Frank Brieff, Harvey Shapiro, Gerald Fiore, and Richard Moore) along with 42 freelancers. A nearly identical cast (a fifth French horn was added) reassembled at Manhattan Center on 6 October for a "binaural [stereo] experiment." No matrix numbers or takes are shown, and nothing from the stereo session was issued.

picture

Victor LM-2042 containing the Polonaise from Eugene Onegin

A: 1 October 1953 Enescu: Roumanian Rhapsody no 1 in A major opus 11 no 1
Tchaikovsky-Stokowski: Eugene Onegin opus 24: Act III "Polonaise"
B: 6 October 1953 Enescu: Roumanian Rhapsody no 1 in A major opus 11 no 1
Tchaikovsky-Stokowski: Eugene Onegin opus 24: Act II Waltz
Violin I: Louis Gabowitz, Herbert Baumel, Lywen, Erle, Nadien, Hollander, Harry Fagin, Alexander Cores, Lomask
Violin II: Raimondi, Werner Torkanowsky, Maximilian Pilzer, Cohen, George Ciompi
Viola: Walter Trampler, Emanuel Vardi, Frank Brieff, Calmen Fleisig
Cello: Harvey Shapiro, Adam, Charles McCracken, Gaston Dubois
Double Bass: Mensch, Fiore, Samson Coscia
Flute: Baker, Claude Monteux    Piccolo: Ben Gaskins
Oboe: Bloom, Criss    English horn: Richard Nass
Clarinet: Portnoy, Cancellieri    Bassoon: Harold Goltzer, Jack Knitzer
French Horn: Moore, Lester Salomon, Ray Alonge, Silvio Coscia, John Barrows (B)
Trumpet: Fornarotto, Isidor Blank, Pasquale (Pat) Ciricillo, Theodore Weiss
Trombone: David Uber, Edward Erwin, C. Michelmore    Tuba (ABC): Phillips
Percussion: Castka, Abraham Marcus    Harp: Agostini

RCA’s final recording session with "Leopold Stokowski and His Symphony Orchestra" took place at Webster Hall. Strings are now ten first violins, eight seconds, six violas, six cellos, four double basses. A mostly new group of little-known freelancers participates, along with seven NBC members (Philip Frank, Emmanuel Vardi, Frank Brieff, Harvey Shapiro, Jacob Bernstein, Emmerich Gara, and Joseph Rescigno) and one from the Philharmonic (Albert Goltzer). Did Stokowski, who was always interested in young performers, fill out this session with students?

 

picture

Stokowski in 1954

29 December 1953 Falla: The Three-Cornered Hat (1919): Dances
- Dance of the Miller's Wife
- Dance of the Neighbors
- Dance of the Miller
- Dance of the Magistrate
- Danza final: Jota

This recording seems not to have been issued by Victor

Violin I: Louis Gabowitz, Philip Frank, Nadien, Helen Shomer, Alfred Breuning, Isidor Lateiner, Kuttner, Maximilian Pilzer, Hugo Gottesmann, Nick Melatti
Violin II: Gershman, Cores, Cohen, Eugene Bergen, Lomask, Sandor Balint, Jacques Neiblum, Dino S. Proto
Viola: Walter Trampler, Emanuel Vardi, Frank Brieff, Calmen Fleisig
Cello: Emanuel Vardi, Raphael Hillyer, Brieff, Harold Colletta, David Schwartz, George Steiner
Double Bass: Mensch, Theodore Flowerman, Edgar Ghilanda
Flute: Baker, Watkins    Piccolo: Ben Gaskins
Oboe: Bloom, Lehrfeld    English horn: Albert Goltzer
Clarinet: Portnoy, Vincent J. Abato    Bassoon: Harold Goltzer, Loren Glickman
French Horn: Anthony Miranda, Joseph Rescigno, William E, Blanchard, Arthur B. Holmes
Trumpet: Theodore Weiss, Fornarotto, Ciricillo
Trombone: Uber, Erwin, George F. Michelmore    Tuba: Herbert Wekselblatt
Percussion: Castka, Bratman, Alvin Broemel    Harp: Ruth Negri
Piano: Colston    Celesta: Louis Brunelli, Jr.

 

Stokowski recorded Mozart and Beethoven Turkish Marches with the NBC Symphony on 9 June 1955. These were initially issued on a popularly marketed LP (LM 2042) entitled "In the Lighter Vein." The front cover says only "Stokowski," but the back credits "His Symphony Orchestra," probably because many other items on the disc were from sessions reported here. Later issues of the marches properly reinstated the NBC orchestra, but a few so-called discographies never got the word.

Discussion

 

The first surprise revealed by this data is that the New York Philharmonic dominated Stokowski’s orchestra, contributing more than 13 times as much as the NBC Symphony (the number of appearances may be off by two or three, as we were not always able to establish the exact date that a player joined or left the NBC Symphony):

 

New York Philharmonic: 2027 appearances by 111 musicians
NBC Symphony Orchestra: 150 appearances by 26 musicians
From the freelance pool: 1155 appearances by 156 musicians

 

Eighty four of the freelancers were visiting firemen who appeared in no more than three sessions. Violinist Louis Gabowitz played in 62 sessions (33 as concertmaster), oboist Robert Bloom in 61. Concertmasters and section leaders of other orchestras often put in a token appearance at a single session.

 

The qualifications of the musicians from the Philharmonic and the NBC Symphony speak for themselves, but what of the so-called "local freelancers?" Many were stars in their own right, who deserve bountiful paragraphs rather than one-line tweets:

 

Violin
Roman Totenberg, Stokowski’s first concertmaster, a noted solo violinist, was Concertmaster of Stokowski's New York City Symphony 1944-1945
Louis Gabowitz, Philadelphia Orchestra rotating Concertmaster, 1928-1939, Louisville Symphony Concertmater and Associate Conductor
Hugo Kolberg, Concertmaster of Berlin Philharmonic 1931-1936, Pittsburgh 1940-1941, 1946-1949, Cleveland 1941-1942, Metropolitan Opera 1942-1944
Broadus Erle, Violin I of the New Music Quartet; Violin II of the Yale Quartet
David Nadien, later to become Concertmaster of the New York Philharmonic 1966-1971.
Victor Aitay Chicago Symphony Orchestra violin 1954-2003, Concertmaster 1967-1986
Hugo Fiorato, later violinist and conductor of the New York City Ballet Orchestra.
Jeanne Mitchell played seven violin concertos with the New York Philharmonic.
Herbert Baumel Philadelphia Orchestra violin 1945-1948, premiered Samuel Barber’s Violin Concerto
Inez Lauritano, 1932 Walter A. Naumburg Competition winner, and soloist with US several orchestras.
Joyce Flissler, 1951 Naumburg and 1958 Tchaikovsky Competition winner and concert soloist with US and European orchestras.
Richard Leshin, Los Angeles Philharmonic violin 1948-1995, Concertmaster New Orleans Symphony, Amati Quartet 1955-1969.
Hugo Gottesmann Busch Quartet viola 1946-1951 and Concertmaster of the Vienna Concertverein Orchestra in the 1930s.
Harry Zarief, father of the first quadruplets born in a New York hospital; Concertmaster of CBS Radio staff orchestra in 1940s.
Viola
Walter Trampler, renowned soloist, Principal viola of the Berlin Radio Orchestra in 1930s and member of the Yale Quartet in 1970s.
John A. DiJanni, principal viola of the Metropolitan Opera, 1936-1975.
Calmen Fleisig New York Philharmonic violin 1938-1943, dismissed by incoming Arthur Rodzinski.
Harry Zaratzian Houston Symphony Principal viola 1950-1951, Philadelphia Orchestra Principal 1954-1956 as well as New York Philharmonic
Cello
Bernard Greenhouse, founding member of the Beaux Arts Trio.
Herman Busch, cellist of the Busch String Quartet.
Robert Jamieson, Minneapolis Symphony Principal cello for 40 years 1951-1991.
Charles McCracken was Principal cello of the Metropolitan Opera and toured with the Marlboro Trio in 1960s, 1970s and 1980s
Bass
Gerald Fiore was Cleveland Orchestra Principal bass 1918-1930 and Metropolitan Opera Principal 1934-1956
Philip Sklar was Principal bass with the Detroit Symphony, and bass with the NBC Symphony during nearly all of Toscanini's tenure 1939-1954
Flute
Julius Baker, who would succeed John Wummer as new York Philharmonic Principal flute 1965-1983.
Murray Graitzer, San Francisco Symphony Principal flute 1948-1950, 1951-1957
Frederick Wilkins was Principal Flute with the New York City Ballet, and the New York City Opera
Harold Bennett Pittsburgh Symphony Principal 1938-1940, Philadelphia Orchestra Assistant Principal 1940-1944, Metropolitan Opera Principal 1944-1965
Oboe
Robert Bloom, Rochester Philharmonic Principal Oboe 1936-1938, NBC Symphony Principal 1938-1944, teacher of many other of Stokowski’s oboists.
Ray Still, Buffalo Philharmonic Principal 1947-1949, Baltimore Symphony Principal 1949-1953 and Principal Oboe Chicago Symphony 1953-1993.
William Arrowsmith, principal at the Metropolitan Opera, 1947-1986
William Criss, principal at the Metropolitan Opera, 1949-1959
Ralph Gomberg, Principal Oboe of Stokowski's 1940 All-American Youth Orchestra, Baltimore Symphony Principal, Boston Symphony Principal 1950-1987
Marc Lifschey Cleveland Orchestra Principal 1950-1959, 1960-1965, Metropolitan Opera Principal 1959-1960, San Francisco Symphony Principal 1965-1986
Bert B. Glassman was Principal Oboe of the Los Angeles Philharmonic and of the Metropolitan Opera.
Robert Lehrfeld was New York Philharmonic oboe, 1954-1955
English Horn
Mitch Miller, popular music personality, head of Artists and Repertoire (A&R) at Columbia Records
Richard Nass was Pittsburgh Symphony English Horn under Reiner 1945-1951, Metropolitan Opera English Horn 1951-1999
Clarinet
David Oppenheim. Leonard Bernstein wrote a Clarinet Sonata for him, and he directed the Masterworks division of Columbia Records 1950-1959
Robert McGinnis before the New York Philharmonic was Principal Clarinet of the Cleveland Orchestra 1940-1941, 1946-1947
Bernard Portnoy was Principal Clarinet in Pittsburgh 1937-1940, of the Philadelphia Orchestra 1940-1943, of the Cleveland Orchestra 1947-1953
George Roedelberger was clarinet and bass clarinet of the Metropolitan Opera
Bassoon
Sol Schoenbach was Philadelphia Orchestra Principal Bassoon 1937-1957
Bernard Garfield was Philadelphia Orchestra Principal 1957-2000 succeeding Sol Schoenbach
Hugo Burghauser, was bassoon of the Vienna Philharmonic and dedicatee of Richard Strauss’s Duet-Concertino, and Metropolitan Opera bassoon 1943-1965
Horn
Anthony "Tony" Miranda was Principal horn of the New York City Opera for 12 seasons
John Barrows was City Opera horn 1946-1949 and New York City Ballet horn 1952-1955 and played in the Casals Festival Orchestra 1958-1961
Trumpet
Isidor Blank was Principal Trumpet with the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra
Theodore Weiss was trumpet with the New York City Opera and the New York City Ballet
Harry Freistadt was Principal Trumpet of the CBS Network staff orchestra and died young (56) in Paris while on tour
Trombone
Erwin Price, founding member of the New York Brass Quintet (1954-1985)
Percussion
Elayne Jones was Timpani of the New York City Opera 1949-1960, Timpani of Stokowski's American Symphony 1960-1971, SF Symphony 1972-1975
Alvin Broemel was Principal Percussion with the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra
Harp
Lucile Lawrence was harp of the Radio City Music Hall orchestra in the 1930s, and personally associated with Stokowski when she taught at Curtis 1927-1935
Canadian Gloria Agostini was Montreal Symphony harp; with Lincoln Center Chamber Music Society performed Boulez, Ginastera, Cowell, Wuorinen premieres
Chamber Musicians
Isidore Cohen, Claus Adam, and Raphael Hillyer of the Juilliard String Quartet
Jerome Roth, David Glazer, and John Barrows of the New York Woodwind Quintet.

Others played in local orchestras, at the Met, and at New York City Opera and Ballet. Many were long-time teachers in one or more of New York’s conservatories: The Juilliard School, the Manhattan School of Music, and Mannes College. Some became successful businessmen: David Oppenheim, president of Columbia Masterworks, became Dean of New York University’s School of the Arts. Carroll Bratman founded his own percussion rental and sales business in 1945, which still thrives today. Many played popular music and jazz – the more gigs, the more money, in an era when musicians were grossly underpaid. More than a dozen of Stokowski’s players appeared on Tony Bennett 78s, and a 1969 Paul Desmond LP lists Paul Gershman, Charles McCracken, George Ricci, George Ockner, Raoul Poliakin, Max Pollikoff, Matthew Raimondi, and Sylvan Shulman. One can be sure that Stokowski instructed Joe Fabbroni to hire only the best.

 

These monaural recordings made "Leopold Stokowski and His Symphony Orchestra" a household (or at least a record-store) name; they were very popular at the time but had a short shelf life due to the impact of stereo LPs beginning in 1958. Most of them are now available on CD, on specialist historical labels such as Cala. Some "His Orchestra" live recordings come from the few concerts given using that title. In Stokowski’s discography, "His Symphony Orchestra" continues to appear well beyond the RCA years, on labels of EMI (Capitol, Seraphim), Vanguard (Bach Guild), and CRI. Whether or not these recordings are considered to be by the same orchestra is moot; they do not fit here but offer a subject for further exploration.

 

Acknowledgements

 

The author expresses grateful appreciation to Tom Tierney, Director of Sony Music Archives Library, and to Barbara Haws, New York Philharmonic Archivist/Historian. Clarinetist Stanley Drucker supplied memories of contractor Joseph Fabbroni. Norman Schweikert, Dick O’Connor, and Dennis D. Rooney identified various musicians. Jon Samuels offered advice and information. Richard A. Kaplan supplied one crucial piece of information: the translation of "piston" on a recording sheet to "cornet à pistons."

 

Sources

 

RCA Victor session logs and payment sheets at Sony Music Archives, New York City. Dated personnel lists in New York Philharmonic: The Historic Broadcasts 1923-1987. Mortimer H. Frank Arturo Toscanini: The NBC Years (Amadeus Press, 2002). Oliver Daniel Stokowski: A Counterpoint of View (Dodd, Mead & Company, 1982). The New York Times (12 February 1944).

 

James H. North was for 35 years a member of IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Laboratory. His work in the 1950s has been called a foundation stone of artificial intelligence, and his development of automated problem-solving software enabled the physical design of computer logic chips. Since 1988 he has been a freelance music critic, writing for such publications as Fanfare, ARSC Journal, and Classic Record Collector. He has written program notes for a number of labels, plus discographies in four of the five New York Philharmonic historical CD sets. Mr. North’s publications, two of which have received ARSC Awards, include discographies of the New York Philharmonic, the Boston Symphony, and Andre Kostelanetz.

North discographies

 


 

Click here to read the Edward Johnson article on Stokowski and Vaughan Williams .

 

Click here to read the Edward Johnson article on Leopold Stokowski Letters .

 

Click here to read the Edward Johnson article on Stokowski's Return to Britain .

 

Click here to read the José Serebrier article on Stokowki Transcriptions

 

Click here to read the James H. North article on Stokowski and "His Symphony Orchestra"

 

Click here to go to the Home Page of stokowski.org .

 


 

If you have any comments or questions about this Leopold Stokowski site, please e-mail me (Larry Huffman) at e-mail address: leopold.stokowski@gmail.com  

 


1  The New York Times. New York, New York. 12 February 1944.
2  pages 15-33. North, James H. Leopold Stokowski and His Symphony Orchestra: Personnel Rosters for the RCA Victor Recordings ARCS Journal. 44:1 2013.
3  Daniel, Oliver.  Stokowski A Counterpoint of View.  Dodd, Mead & Company New York 1982 ISBN 0-396-07936-9
4  page 449.  Kottick, Edward.  A History of the Harpsichord.  Indiana University Press. Bloomington, Indiana. 2003. ISBN-13: 9780253341662
5  page 561  Daniel, Oliver.  Stokowski A Counterpoint of View.  op. cit.

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L'Héritage de Stokowski - Accueil français

Victor Talking Machine Company, Eldridge Johnson, et le développement de la technologie d'enregistrement acoustique

1917 - 1924 les enregistrements acoustique Victor de Leopold Stokowski et l'Orchestre de Philadelphie

1917 -  Premiers enregistrements acoustique de Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1917 - 1919 autres enregistrements acoustique Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1920 - 1921 autres enregistrements acoustique Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1922 - 1924 autres enregistrements acoustique Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1919 - 1924 enregistrements acoustique Russe Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1920 - 1924 enregistrements acoustique français - Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1921 -1924 enregistrements acoustique Tchaïkovski - Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1921 - 1924 enregistrements acoustique Wagner - Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1924 enregistrements acoustique Rachmaninov - Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

Développement de l'enregistrement électrique

Permis d'exploitation du système Westrex donné à Victor et Columbia

1925 Premier enregistrement électrique Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1925 autres enregistrements électriques Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1926 enregistrements électriques Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1927 enregistrements électriques Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

Encore des enregistrements 1927 électriques Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1928 enregistrements électriques Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1929 enregistrements électriques Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1930 enregistrements électriques Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1931 enregistrements électriques Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1932 enregistrements électriques Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1933 enregistrements électriques Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1934 enregistrements électriques Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

Encore des enregistrements 1934 électriques Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1935 enregistrements électriques Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1936 enregistrements électriques Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1937 enregistrements électriques Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

1939-1940 enregistrements électriques Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie

D'autres documents sur Stokowski et l'Orchestre de Philadelphie

Camden église studio - Victor Talking Machine studio d'enregistrement

Leopold Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie Enregistrement à l'Académie de musique de Philadelphie

Interviews avec Leopold Stokowski

Leopold Stokowski Orchestrations

Leopold Stokowski, Harvey Fletcher et les laboratoires Bell expérimental enregistrements

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CDs de Stokowski et l'Orchestre de Philadelphie

Leopold Stokowski Discographies chronologique

      Leopold Stokowski Discographie chronologique - enregistrements acoustique

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Leopold Stokowski - Orchestre de Philadelphie bibliographie, des sources et crédits

L'Orchestre symphonique de Boston - musiciens principaux

L'Orchestre symphonique de Chicago - musiciens principaux

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L'Orchestre du Metropolitan Opera de New York - musiciens principaux

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L'Orchestre symphonique Russe de New York - musiciens principaux

L'Orchestre symphonique de San Francisco - musiciens principaux

L'Orchestre symphonique de St. Louis - musiciens principaux